Wharfedale Naturalists News Blog

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Farnley Hall Woods

Farnley Hall Woods, backing on to our Otley garden, are full of moths at the moment although unfortunately almost all are of just one species. From late June onwards my moth trap is dominated...

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Birdfeeder newcomer

There’s been a newcomer at our peanut feeder over the past few weeks. A young great spotted woodpecker has been coming several times each day and attacking the nuts fiercely as though hammering through...

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Exotic bee

A great advantage of being a Wharfedale Naturalist is that I am part of a network, an ever-expanding web of connections. It brings me stories for these Notes, and can supply expert advice. There’s...

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Mysterious holes

Most of us spend a lot of time scrutinising our gardens or the countryside we habitually walk through: we generally know the creatures we are likely to see there. Night-time is a different matter....

Peppered moth by Denis O'Connor 0

Peppered moths

During the day our garden is alive with insects. The brambles, rampant once again despite my attempts to eradicate them, have their flowers covered with bumblebees and hoverflies with an occasional butterfly. The same...

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May songbirds

I thought I already knew what a hard time the breeding season was for our songbirds: defending territory, building nests, brooding eggs, feeding nestling and then fledgling young – as well as all that...

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Mustelids

You may think you know the animals that live in your immediate neighbourhood – but there are always surprises. A few weeks ago, my husband was just in time to see a weasel dash...

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Spring wildlife

After years of spring arriving earlier and earlier, this year a more traditional late winter pattern was restored as the Beast from the East roared in from Siberia and collided with Storm Emma sweeping...

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Spring birds

It is the time of the returners. Cuckoos have returned to Ilkley Moor – and rather earlier than usual. Perhaps the balmy weather a couple of weeks ago had something to do with this....

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Spring foliage

I have always loved looking at trees. As a child my main interest was assessing their climb-ability, but as I grew up the admiration became more aesthetic. Like most of us in the UK...